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2007_2012_NOISE_END_LAEA_Exposure_Changes (MapServer)
Title 2007_2012_NOISE_END_LAEA_Exposure_Changes
Author European Topic Centre - Air Pollution and Climate Change Mitigation
Subject Changes in population exposure from 2007 to 2012, as defined by the European Noise Directive
Keywords Noise,Environment,dB,Airports,Railways,Roads
Copyright Text © Copyright 2012 EEA Copenhagen
Registered first time 06 Oct 2014
Service Description
Environmental noise affects a large number of Europeans. The public perceives it as one of the major environmental problems. It can affect people in both physiological and psychological ways, interfering with basic activities such as sleep, rest, study and communication. Even though these impacts on human health have long been known, recent research shows that they arise at lower noise levels than was previously thought. Environmental noise — an unwanted or harmful outdoor sound — is spreading, both in its duration and geographical coverage. Noise is associated with many human activities, but it is road, rail and air traffic noise that has the highest impact. This is particularly a problem for the urban environment; about 75 % of Europe’s population lives in cities, and traffic volumes are still on the rise. Country reviews show that the number of complaints related to environmental noise is increasing in many European countries. Since environmental noise is persistent and inescapable, a significant proportion of the population is exposed to it. The EU Green Paper Future Noise Policy states that around 20 % of the EU’s population suffer from noise levels that health experts consider to be unacceptable, i.e. which can lead to annoyance, sleep disturbance and adverse health effects. The World Health Organisation (WHO) estimates that about 40 % of the population in the EU is exposed to road traffic noise at levels exceeding 55 dB(A), and that more than 30 % is exposed to levels exceeding 55 dB(A) during the night. In turn, the NOISE database presents the most up-to-date information on noise exposure as officially reported by EEA member countries. The quantification of the related disease burden of environmental noise is an emerging challenge for policy makers. Noise exposure not only leads to sleep disturbance, annoyance and hearing impairment, but also to other health problems such as cardiovascular disorders. The burden of disease from environmental noise has not yet
Description
Environmental noise affects a large number of Europeans. The public perceives it as one of the major environmental problems. It can affect people in both physiological and psychological ways, interfering with basic activities such as sleep, rest, study and communication. Even though these impacts on human health have long been known, recent research shows that they arise at lower noise levels than was previously thought. Environmental noise — an unwanted or harmful outdoor sound — is spreading, both in its duration and geographical coverage. Noise is associated with many human activities, but it is road, rail and air traffic noise that has the highest impact. This is particularly a problem for the urban environment; about 75 % of Europe’s population lives in cities, and traffic volumes are still on the rise. Country reviews show that the number of complaints related to environmental noise is increasing in many European countries. Since environmental noise is persistent and inescapable, a significant proportion of the population is exposed to it. The EU Green Paper Future Noise Policy states that around 20 % of the EU’s population suffer from noise levels that health experts consider to be unacceptable, i.e. which can lead to annoyance, sleep disturbance and adverse health effects. The World Health Organisation (WHO) estimates that about 40 % of the population in the EU is exposed to road traffic noise at levels exceeding 55 dB(A), and that more than 30 % is exposed to levels exceeding 55 dB(A) during the night. In turn, the NOISE database presents the most up-to-date information on noise exposure as officially reported by EEA member countries. The quantification of the related disease burden of environmental noise is an emerging challenge for policy makers. Noise exposure not only leads to sleep disturbance, annoyance and hearing impairment, but also to other health problems such as cardiovascular disorders. The burden of disease from environmental noise has not yet
SRS 3035
Extent 1706505.1140000001,962611.36610000022,5799523.1598000005,4484103.5986000001
Layers Changes in population exposure in major airports 2007-2012,Lden >= 55dB,Total - Lden >= 55dB,Data on changes not available,Lnight >= 50dB,Total - Lnight >= 50dB,Data on changes not available,Changes in population exposure within agglomerations 2007-2012,Airports,Lden >= 55dB,Percentage (%) - Lden >= 55dB,Total - Lden >= 55dB,Data on changes not available,Data on changes not applicable,Lnight >
Map Name EEA-NOISE VIEWER
Category
2007_NOISE_END_LAEA_Contours (MapServer)
Title 2007_NOISE_END_LAEA_Contours
Author European Topic Centre - Air Pollution and Climate Change Mitigation
Subject Noise levels in 2007, expressed in contour maps and measured in dB, as defined by the European Noise Directive
Keywords Noise,Environment,dB,Airports,Railways,Roads
Copyright Text © Copyright 2012 EEA Copenhagen
Registered first time 06 Oct 2014
Service Description
Environmental noise affects a large number of Europeans. The public perceives it as one of the major environmental problems. It can affect people in both physiological and psychological ways, interfering with basic activities such as sleep, rest, study and communication. Even though these impacts on human health have long been known, recent research shows that they arise at lower noise levels than was previously thought. Environmental noise — an unwanted or harmful outdoor sound — is spreading, both in its duration and geographical coverage. Noise is associated with many human activities, but it is road, rail and air traffic noise that has the highest impact. This is particularly a problem for the urban environment; about 75 % of Europe’s population lives in cities, and traffic volumes are still on the rise. Country reviews show that the number of complaints related to environmental noise is increasing in many European countries. Since environmental noise is persistent and inescapable, a significant proportion of the population is exposed to it. The EU Green Paper Future Noise Policy states that around 20 % of the EU’s population suffer from noise levels that health experts consider to be unacceptable, i.e. which can lead to annoyance, sleep disturbance and adverse health effects. The World Health Organisation (WHO) estimates that about 40 % of the population in the EU is exposed to road traffic noise at levels exceeding 55 dB(A), and that more than 30 % is exposed to levels exceeding 55 dB(A) during the night. In turn, the NOISE database presents the most up-to-date information on noise exposure as officially reported by EEA member countries. The quantification of the related disease burden of environmental noise is an emerging challenge for policy makers. Noise exposure not only leads to sleep disturbance, annoyance and hearing impairment, but also to other health problems such as cardiovascular disorders. The burden of disease from environmental noise has not yet
Description
SRS 3035
Extent 2641480.5211999984,1430245.19566158,5326962.2585615804,4903935.5418615825
Layers Contour Maps 2007,AT - Austria,Austria Major Railways Lden,Austria Major Railways Lnight,Austria Major Roads Lden,Austria Major Roads Lnight,Viena Major Airports Lden,Viena Major Airports Lnight,Viena Agglomeration Industries Lden,Viena Agglomeration Industries Lnight,BE - Belgium,Brussels Major Airports Lden,Brussels Major Airports Lnight,Brussels Major Railways Lden,Brussels Major Railways Lnigh
Map Name Layers
Category
2007_NOISE_END_LAEA_Update2012 (MapServer)
Title 2007_NOISE_END_LAEA_Update2012
Author European Topic Centre - Air Pollution and Climate Change Mitigation
Subject Number of people exposed in 2007, as defined by the European Noise Directive
Keywords Noise,Environment,dB,Airports,Railways,Roads
Copyright Text © Copyright 2012 EEA Copenhagen
Registered first time 06 Oct 2014
Service Description
Environmental noise affects a large number of Europeans. The public perceives it as one of the major environmental problems. It can affect people in both physiological and psychological ways, interfering with basic activities such as sleep, rest, study and communication. Even though these impacts on human health have long been known, recent research shows that they arise at lower noise levels than was previously thought. Environmental noise — an unwanted or harmful outdoor sound — is spreading, both in its duration and geographical coverage. Noise is associated with many human activities, but it is road, rail and air traffic noise that has the highest impact. This is particularly a problem for the urban environment; about 75 % of Europe’s population lives in cities, and traffic volumes are still on the rise. Country reviews show that the number of complaints related to environmental noise is increasing in many European countries. Since environmental noise is persistent and inescapable, a significant proportion of the population is exposed to it. The EU Green Paper Future Noise Policy states that around 20 % of the EU’s population suffer from noise levels that health experts consider to be unacceptable, i.e. which can lead to annoyance, sleep disturbance and adverse health effects. The World Health Organisation (WHO) estimates that about 40 % of the population in the EU is exposed to road traffic noise at levels exceeding 55 dB(A), and that more than 30 % is exposed to levels exceeding 55 dB(A) during the night. In turn, the NOISE database presents the most up-to-date information on noise exposure as officially reported by EEA member countries. The quantification of the related disease burden of environmental noise is an emerging challenge for policy makers. Noise exposure not only leads to sleep disturbance, annoyance and hearing impairment, but also to other health problems such as cardiovascular disorders. The burden of disease from environmental noise has not yet
Description
Environmental noise affects a large number of Europeans. The public perceives it as one of the major environmental problems. It can affect people in both physiological and psychological ways, interfering with basic activities such as sleep, rest, study and communication. Even though these impacts on human health have long been known, recent research shows that they arise at lower noise levels than was previously thought. Environmental noise — an unwanted or harmful outdoor sound — is spreading, both in its duration and geographical coverage. Noise is associated with many human activities, but it is road, rail and air traffic noise that has the highest impact. This is particularly a problem for the urban environment; about 75 % of Europe’s population lives in cities, and traffic volumes are still on the rise. Country reviews show that the number of complaints related to environmental noise is increasing in many European countries. Since environmental noise is persistent and inescapable, a significant proportion of the population is exposed to it. The EU Green Paper Future Noise Policy states that around 20 % of the EU’s population suffer from noise levels that health experts consider to be unacceptable, i.e. which can lead to annoyance, sleep disturbance and adverse health effects. The World Health Organisation (WHO) estimates that about 40 % of the population in the EU is exposed to road traffic noise at levels exceeding 55 dB(A), and that more than 30 % is exposed to levels exceeding 55 dB(A) during the night. In turn, the NOISE database presents the most up-to-date information on noise exposure as officially reported by EEA member countries. The quantification of the related disease burden of environmental noise is an emerging challenge for policy makers. Noise exposure not only leads to sleep disturbance, annoyance and hearing impairment, but also to other health problems such as cardiovascular disorders. The burden of disease from environmental noise has not yet
SRS 3035
Extent -2669700.5290999999,-1909635.5860000001,12870233.2322,12599680.041099999
Layers Airport Names,Agglomerations Names,Railways and Roads data,Roads data,Railways data,Countries Border White,Within Agglomerations,Airports,Lden,Above 55dB,No data classes,Total number of people exposed,Percentage ,Above 65dB,No data classes,Total number of people exposed,Percentage,Above 75dB,No data classes,Total number of people exposed,Percentage,Lnight,Above 50dB,No data classes,Total number of
Map Name EEA-NOISE VIEWER
Category
2007_NOISE_END_LAEA_Update2012 (MapServer)
Title 2007_NOISE_END_LAEA_update2015
Author European Topic Centre - Air Pollution and Climate Change Mitigation
Subject Number of people exposed in 2007, as defined by the European Noise Directive
Keywords Noise,Environment,dB,Airports,Railways,Roads
Copyright Text © Copyright 2012 EEA Copenhagen
Registered first time 16 Nov 2015
Service Description
Environmental noise affects a large number of Europeans. The public perceives it as one of the major environmental problems. It can affect people in both physiological and psychological ways, interfering with basic activities such as sleep, rest, study and communication. Even though these impacts on human health have long been known, recent research shows that they arise at lower noise levels than was previously thought. Environmental noise — an unwanted or harmful outdoor sound — is spreading, both in its duration and geographical coverage. Noise is associated with many human activities, but it is road, rail and air traffic noise that has the highest impact. This is particularly a problem for the urban environment; about 75 % of Europe’s population lives in cities, and traffic volumes are still on the rise. Country reviews show that the number of complaints related to environmental noise is increasing in many European countries. Since environmental noise is persistent and inescapable, a significant proportion of the population is exposed to it. The EU Green Paper Future Noise Policy states that around 20 % of the EU’s population suffer from noise levels that health experts consider to be unacceptable, i.e. which can lead to annoyance, sleep disturbance and adverse health effects. The World Health Organisation (WHO) estimates that about 40 % of the population in the EU is exposed to road traffic noise at levels exceeding 55 dB(A), and that more than 30 % is exposed to levels exceeding 55 dB(A) during the night. In turn, the NOISE database presents the most up-to-date information on noise exposure as officially reported by EEA member countries. The quantification of the related disease burden of environmental noise is an emerging challenge for policy makers. Noise exposure not only leads to sleep disturbance, annoyance and hearing impairment, but also to other health problems such as cardiovascular disorders. The burden of disease from environmental noise has not yet
Description
Environmental noise affects a large number of Europeans. The public perceives it as one of the major environmental problems. It can affect people in both physiological and psychological ways, interfering with basic activities such as sleep, rest, study and communication. Even though these impacts on human health have long been known, recent research shows that they arise at lower noise levels than was previously thought. Environmental noise — an unwanted or harmful outdoor sound — is spreading, both in its duration and geographical coverage. Noise is associated with many human activities, but it is road, rail and air traffic noise that has the highest impact. This is particularly a problem for the urban environment; about 75 % of Europe’s population lives in cities, and traffic volumes are still on the rise. Country reviews show that the number of complaints related to environmental noise is increasing in many European countries. Since environmental noise is persistent and inescapable, a significant proportion of the population is exposed to it. The EU Green Paper Future Noise Policy states that around 20 % of the EU’s population suffer from noise levels that health experts consider to be unacceptable, i.e. which can lead to annoyance, sleep disturbance and adverse health effects. The World Health Organisation (WHO) estimates that about 40 % of the population in the EU is exposed to road traffic noise at levels exceeding 55 dB(A), and that more than 30 % is exposed to levels exceeding 55 dB(A) during the night. In turn, the NOISE database presents the most up-to-date information on noise exposure as officially reported by EEA member countries. The quantification of the related disease burden of environmental noise is an emerging challenge for policy makers. Noise exposure not only leads to sleep disturbance, annoyance and hearing impairment, but also to other health problems such as cardiovascular disorders. The burden of disease from environmental noise has not yet
SRS 3035
Extent -2669700.5290999999,-1909635.5860000001,12870233.2322,12599680.041099999
Layers Airport Names,Agglomerations Names,Railways and Roads data,Roads data,Railways data,Countries Border White,Within Agglomerations,Airports,Lden,Above 55dB,No total data available,No percentage data available1,Total number of people exposed,Percentage ,Above 65dB,No total data available,No percentage data available,Total number of people exposed,Percentage,Above 75dB,No total data available,No perce
Map Name EEA-NOISE VIEWER
Category
2012_NOISE_END_LAEA_Contours (MapServer)
Title 2012_NOISE_END_LAEA_Contours
Author European Topic Centre - Air Pollution and Climate Change Mitigation
Subject Noise levels in 2012, expressed in contour maps and measured in dB, as defined by the European Noise Directive
Keywords Noise,Environment,dB,Airports,Railways,Roads
Copyright Text © Copyright 2012 EEA Copenhagen
Registered first time 06 Oct 2014
Service Description
Environmental noise affects a large number of Europeans. The public perceives it as one of the major environmental problems. It can affect people in both physiological and psychological ways, interfering with basic activities such as sleep, rest, study and communication. Even though these impacts on human health have long been known, recent research shows that they arise at lower noise levels than was previously thought. Environmental noise — an unwanted or harmful outdoor sound — is spreading, both in its duration and geographical coverage. Noise is associated with many human activities, but it is road, rail and air traffic noise that has the highest impact. This is particularly a problem for the urban environment; about 75 % of Europe’s population lives in cities, and traffic volumes are still on the rise. Country reviews show that the number of complaints related to environmental noise is increasing in many European countries. Since environmental noise is persistent and inescapable, a significant proportion of the population is exposed to it. The EU Green Paper Future Noise Policy states that around 20 % of the EU’s population suffer from noise levels that health experts consider to be unacceptable, i.e. which can lead to annoyance, sleep disturbance and adverse health effects. The World Health Organisation (WHO) estimates that about 40 % of the population in the EU is exposed to road traffic noise at levels exceeding 55 dB(A), and that more than 30 % is exposed to levels exceeding 55 dB(A) during the night. In turn, the NOISE database presents the most up-to-date information on noise exposure as officially reported by EEA member countries. The quantification of the related disease burden of environmental noise is an emerging challenge for policy makers. Noise exposure not only leads to sleep disturbance, annoyance and hearing impairment, but also to other health problems such as cardiovascular disorders. The burden of disease from environmental noise has not yet
Description
SRS 3035
Extent 1697064.7726289122,953830.46969513083,5773775.4052648246,5332113.5439999998
Layers Contour Maps,2012 - Update 2014_06,BG - Bulgaria,Bulgaria Major Roads Lden,Bulgaria Major Roads Lnight,CH - Switzerland,Switzerland Major Airports Lden,Switzerland Major Airports Lnight,Switzerland Major Railways Lden,Switzerland Major Railways Lnight,Switzerland Major Roads Lden,Switzerland Major Roads Lnight,Baden Agglomeration Airports Lden,Baden Agglomeration Airports Lnight,Baden Agglomeratio
Map Name Contour Maps
Category
2012_NOISE_END_LAEA_Major_Airports (MapServer)
Title 2012_NOISE_END_LAEA_Major_Airports
Author European Topic Centre - Air Pollution and Climate Change Mitigation
Subject Noise exposure 2012 delivery from Major Airports data
Keywords Noise,Environment,dB,Airports
Copyright Text © Copyright 2012 EEA Copenhagen
Registered first time 06 Oct 2014
Service Description
Environmental noise affects a large number of Europeans. The public perceives it as one of the major environmental problems. It can affect people in both physiological and psychological ways, interfering with basic activities such as sleep, rest, study and communication. Even though these impacts on human health have long been known, recent research shows that they arise at lower noise levels than was previously thought. Environmental noise — an unwanted or harmful outdoor sound — is spreading, both in its duration and geographical coverage. Noise is associated with many human activities, but it is road, rail and air traffic noise that has the highest impact. This is particularly a problem for the urban environment; about 75 % of Europe’s population lives in cities, and traffic volumes are still on the rise. Country reviews show that the number of complaints related to environmental noise is increasing in many European countries. Since environmental noise is persistent and inescapable, a significant proportion of the population is exposed to it. The EU Green Paper Future Noise Policy states that around 20 % of the EU’s population suffer from noise levels that health experts consider to be unacceptable, i.e. which can lead to annoyance, sleep disturbance and adverse health effects. The World Health Organisation (WHO) estimates that about 40 % of the population in the EU is exposed to road traffic noise at levels exceeding 55 dB(A), and that more than 30 % is exposed to levels exceeding 55 dB(A) during the night. In turn, the NOISE database presents the most up-to-date information on noise exposure as officially reported by EEA member countries. The quantification of the related disease burden of environmental noise is an emerging challenge for policy makers. Noise exposure not only leads to sleep disturbance, annoyance and hearing impairment, but also to other health problems such as cardiovascular disorders. The burden of disease from environmental noise has not yet
Description
Environmental noise affects a large number of Europeans. The public perceives it as one of the major environmental problems. It can affect people in both physiological and psychological ways, interfering with basic activities such as sleep, rest, study and communication. Even though these impacts on human health have long been known, recent research shows that they arise at lower noise levels than was previously thought. Environmental noise — an unwanted or harmful outdoor sound — is spreading, both in its duration and geographical coverage. Noise is associated with many human activities, but it is road, rail and air traffic noise that has the highest impact. This is particularly a problem for the urban environment; about 75 % of Europe’s population lives in cities, and traffic volumes are still on the rise. Country reviews show that the number of complaints related to environmental noise is increasing in many European countries. Since environmental noise is persistent and inescapable, a significant proportion of the population is exposed to it. The EU Green Paper Future Noise Policy states that around 20 % of the EU’s population suffer from noise levels that health experts consider to be unacceptable, i.e. which can lead to annoyance, sleep disturbance and adverse health effects. The World Health Organisation (WHO) estimates that about 40 % of the population in the EU is exposed to road traffic noise at levels exceeding 55 dB(A), and that more than 30 % is exposed to levels exceeding 55 dB(A) during the night. In turn, the NOISE database presents the most up-to-date information on noise exposure as officially reported by EEA member countries. The quantification of the related disease burden of environmental noise is an emerging challenge for policy makers. Noise exposure not only leads to sleep disturbance, annoyance and hearing impairment, but also to other health problems such as cardiovascular disorders. The burden of disease from environmental noise has not yet
SRS 3035
Extent -2669700.5290999999,-1909635.5860000001,12870233.2322,12599680.041099999
Layers Major Airports,Lden,Above 55dB,No Data Classes,Total number of people exposed,Less than 4300 people exposed,4300 - 10400 people exposed,10500 - 18300 people exposed,18400 - 52500 people exposed,More than 52500 people exposed,Above 65dB,No Data Classes,Total number of people exposed,Less than 100 people exposed,100 - 400 people exposed,500 - 1100 people exposed,1200 - 1900 people exposed,More than
Map Name EEA-NOISE VIEWER
Category
NOISE_END_LAEA.mxd (MapServer)
Title 2012_NOISE_END_LAEA_Major_Railways
Author European Topic Centre - Air Pollution and Climate Change Mitigation
Subject Noise exposure 2012 delivery from Major Railways data
Keywords Noise,Environment,dB,Airports,Railways,Roads
Copyright Text © Copyright 2012 EEA Copenhagen
Registered first time 06 Oct 2014
Service Description
Environmental noise affects a large number of Europeans. The public perceives it as one of the major environmental problems. It can affect people in both physiological and psychological ways, interfering with basic activities such as sleep, rest, study and communication. Even though these impacts on human health have long been known, recent research shows that they arise at lower noise levels than was previously thought. Environmental noise — an unwanted or harmful outdoor sound — is spreading, both in its duration and geographical coverage. Noise is associated with many human activities, but it is road, rail and air traffic noise that has the highest impact. This is particularly a problem for the urban environment; about 75 % of Europe’s population lives in cities, and traffic volumes are still on the rise. Country reviews show that the number of complaints related to environmental noise is increasing in many European countries. Since environmental noise is persistent and inescapable, a significant proportion of the population is exposed to it. The EU Green Paper Future Noise Policy states that around 20 % of the EU’s population suffer from noise levels that health experts consider to be unacceptable, i.e. which can lead to annoyance, sleep disturbance and adverse health effects. The World Health Organisation (WHO) estimates that about 40 % of the population in the EU is exposed to road traffic noise at levels exceeding 55 dB(A), and that more than 30 % is exposed to levels exceeding 55 dB(A) during the night. In turn, the NOISE database presents the most up-to-date information on noise exposure as officially reported by EEA member countries. The quantification of the related disease burden of environmental noise is an emerging challenge for policy makers. Noise exposure not only leads to sleep disturbance, annoyance and hearing impairment, but also to other health problems such as cardiovascular disorders. The burden of disease from environmental noise has not yet
Description
Environmental noise affects a large number of Europeans. The public perceives it as one of the major environmental problems. It can affect people in both physiological and psychological ways, interfering with basic activities such as sleep, rest, study and communication. Even though these impacts on human health have long been known, recent research shows that they arise at lower noise levels than was previously thought. Environmental noise — an unwanted or harmful outdoor sound — is spreading, both in its duration and geographical coverage. Noise is associated with many human activities, but it is road, rail and air traffic noise that has the highest impact. This is particularly a problem for the urban environment; about 75 % of Europe’s population lives in cities, and traffic volumes are still on the rise. Country reviews show that the number of complaints related to environmental noise is increasing in many European countries. Since environmental noise is persistent and inescapable, a significant proportion of the population is exposed to it. The EU Green Paper Future Noise Policy states that around 20 % of the EU’s population suffer from noise levels that health experts consider to be unacceptable, i.e. which can lead to annoyance, sleep disturbance and adverse health effects. The World Health Organisation (WHO) estimates that about 40 % of the population in the EU is exposed to road traffic noise at levels exceeding 55 dB(A), and that more than 30 % is exposed to levels exceeding 55 dB(A) during the night. In turn, the NOISE database presents the most up-to-date information on noise exposure as officially reported by EEA member countries. The quantification of the related disease burden of environmental noise is an emerging challenge for policy makers. Noise exposure not only leads to sleep disturbance, annoyance and hearing impairment, but also to other health problems such as cardiovascular disorders. The burden of disease from environmental noise has not yet
SRS 3035
Extent 942100.9626000002,941726.46590000018,7316568.8175000008,5414446.1743999999
Layers Major Railways,Lden,Above 55dB,No total data available,No relative data available,Total number of people exposed,Relative value of people per km,Above 65dB,No total data available,No relative data available,Total number of people exposed,Relative value of people per km,Above 75dB,No total data available,No relative data available,Total number of people exposed,Relative value of people per km,Lnigh
Map Name EEA-NOISE VIEWER
Category
NOISE_END_LAEA.mxd (MapServer)
Title 2012_NOISE_END_LAEA_Major_Roads
Author European Topic Centre - Air Pollution and Climate Change Mitigation
Subject Number of people exposed from Major Roads in 2012, as defined by the European Noise Directive.
Keywords Noise,Environment,dB,Airports,Railways,Roads
Copyright Text © Copyright 2012 EEA Copenhagen
Registered first time 06 Oct 2014
Service Description
Environmental noise affects a large number of Europeans. The public perceives it as one of the major environmental problems. It can affect people in both physiological and psychological ways, interfering with basic activities such as sleep, rest, study and communication. Even though these impacts on human health have long been known, recent research shows that they arise at lower noise levels than was previously thought. Environmental noise — an unwanted or harmful outdoor sound — is spreading, both in its duration and geographical coverage. Noise is associated with many human activities, but it is road, rail and air traffic noise that has the highest impact. This is particularly a problem for the urban environment; about 75 % of Europe’s population lives in cities, and traffic volumes are still on the rise. Country reviews show that the number of complaints related to environmental noise is increasing in many European countries. Since environmental noise is persistent and inescapable, a significant proportion of the population is exposed to it. The EU Green Paper Future Noise Policy states that around 20 % of the EU’s population suffer from noise levels that health experts consider to be unacceptable, i.e. which can lead to annoyance, sleep disturbance and adverse health effects. The World Health Organisation (WHO) estimates that about 40 % of the population in the EU is exposed to road traffic noise at levels exceeding 55 dB(A), and that more than 30 % is exposed to levels exceeding 55 dB(A) during the night. In turn, the NOISE database presents the most up-to-date information on noise exposure as officially reported by EEA member countries. The quantification of the related disease burden of environmental noise is an emerging challenge for policy makers. Noise exposure not only leads to sleep disturbance, annoyance and hearing impairment, but also to other health problems such as cardiovascular disorders. The burden of disease from environmental noise has not yet
Description
Environmental noise affects a large number of Europeans. The public perceives it as one of the major environmental problems. It can affect people in both physiological and psychological ways, interfering with basic activities such as sleep, rest, study and communication. Even though these impacts on human health have long been known, recent research shows that they arise at lower noise levels than was previously thought. Environmental noise — an unwanted or harmful outdoor sound — is spreading, both in its duration and geographical coverage. Noise is associated with many human activities, but it is road, rail and air traffic noise that has the highest impact. This is particularly a problem for the urban environment; about 75 % of Europe’s population lives in cities, and traffic volumes are still on the rise. Country reviews show that the number of complaints related to environmental noise is increasing in many European countries. Since environmental noise is persistent and inescapable, a significant proportion of the population is exposed to it. The EU Green Paper Future Noise Policy states that around 20 % of the EU’s population suffer from noise levels that health experts consider to be unacceptable, i.e. which can lead to annoyance, sleep disturbance and adverse health effects. The World Health Organisation (WHO) estimates that about 40 % of the population in the EU is exposed to road traffic noise at levels exceeding 55 dB(A), and that more than 30 % is exposed to levels exceeding 55 dB(A) during the night. In turn, the NOISE database presents the most up-to-date information on noise exposure as officially reported by EEA member countries. The quantification of the related disease burden of environmental noise is an emerging challenge for policy makers. Noise exposure not only leads to sleep disturbance, annoyance and hearing impairment, but also to other health problems such as cardiovascular disorders. The burden of disease from environmental noise has not yet
SRS 3035
Extent 942100.9626000002,941726.46590000018,7316568.8175000008,5414446.1743999999
Layers Major Roads,Lden,Above 55dB,No total data available,No relative data available,Total number of people exposed,Relative value of people per km,Above 65dB,No total data available,No relative data available,Total number of people exposed,Relative value of people per km,Above 75dB,No total data available,No relative data available,Total number of people exposed,Relative value of people per km,Lnight,A
Map Name EEA-NOISE VIEWER
Category
Noise Sources 2012 (MapServer)
Title 2012_NOISE_END_LAEA_Noise_Sources
Author European Topic Centre - Air Pollution and Climate Change Mitigation
Subject Noise Sources and auxiliary layers of the Noise Viewer 2012
Keywords Noise,sources,airports,agglomerations,major roads,major railways
Copyright Text © Copyright 2012 EEA Copenhagen
Registered first time 06 Oct 2014
Service Description
Environmental noise affects a large number of Europeans. The public perceives it as one of the major environmental problems. It can affect people in both physiological and psychological ways, interfering with basic activities such as sleep, rest, study and communication. Even though these impacts on human health have long been known, recent research shows that they arise at lower noise levels than was previously thought. Environmental noise — an unwanted or harmful outdoor sound — is spreading, both in its duration and geographical coverage. Noise is associated with many human activities, but it is road, rail and air traffic noise that has the highest impact. This is particularly a problem for the urban environment; about 75 % of Europe’s population lives in cities, and traffic volumes are still on the rise. Country reviews show that the number of complaints related to environmental noise is increasing in many European countries. Since environmental noise is persistent and inescapable, a significant proportion of the population is exposed to it. The EU Green Paper Future Noise Policy states that around 20 % of the EU’s population suffer from noise levels that health experts consider to be unacceptable, i.e. which can lead to annoyance, sleep disturbance and adverse health effects. The World Health Organisation (WHO) estimates that about 40 % of the population in the EU is exposed to road traffic noise at levels exceeding 55 dB(A), and that more than 30 % is exposed to levels exceeding 55 dB(A) during the night. In turn, the NOISE database presents the most up-to-date information on noise exposure as officially reported by EEA member countries. The quantification of the related disease burden of environmental noise is an emerging challenge for policy makers. Noise exposure not only leads to sleep disturbance, annoyance and hearing impairment, but also to other health problems such as cardiovascular disorders. The burden of disease from environmental noise has not yet
Description
Environmental noise affects a large number of Europeans. The public perceives it as one of the major environmental problems. It can affect people in both physiological and psychological ways, interfering with basic activities such as sleep, rest, study and communication. Even though these impacts on human health have long been known, recent research shows that they arise at lower noise levels than was previously thought. Environmental noise — an unwanted or harmful outdoor sound — is spreading, both in its duration and geographical coverage. Noise is associated with many human activities, but it is road, rail and air traffic noise that has the highest impact. This is particularly a problem for the urban environment; about 75 % of Europe’s population lives in cities, and traffic volumes are still on the rise. Country reviews show that the number of complaints related to environmental noise is increasing in many European countries. Since environmental noise is persistent and inescapable, a significant proportion of the population is exposed to it. The EU Green Paper Future Noise Policy states that around 20 % of the EU’s population suffer from noise levels that health experts consider to be unacceptable, i.e. which can lead to annoyance, sleep disturbance and adverse health effects. The World Health Organisation (WHO) estimates that about 40 % of the population in the EU is exposed to road traffic noise at levels exceeding 55 dB(A), and that more than 30 % is exposed to levels exceeding 55 dB(A) during the night. In turn, the NOISE database presents the most up-to-date information on noise exposure as officially reported by EEA member countries. The quantification of the related disease burden of environmental noise is an emerging challenge for policy makers. Noise exposure not only leads to sleep disturbance, annoyance and hearing impairment, but also to other health problems such as cardiovascular disorders. The burden of disease from environmental noise has not yet
SRS 3035
Extent -2672726.7126000002,-3062258.7697000001,12627198.3358,12599680.041099999
Layers Noise Sources,Airport Names,Agglomerations Names,Airport Anual Traffic (movements per year),Agglomerations (Number of inhabitants),Major Roads 2005,Major Roads,Major Rails 2005,Major Rails,Country border grey,Agglomerations Names General View
Map Name EEA-NOISE VIEWER
Category
2012_NOISE_END_LAEA_Contours (MapServer)
Title 2012_NOISE_END_LAEA_update2015_Contours
Author European Topic Centre - Air Pollution and Climate Change Mitigation
Subject Noise levels in 2012, expressed in contour maps and measured in dB, as defined by the European Noise Directive
Keywords Noise,Environment,dB,Airports,Railways,Roads
Copyright Text © Copyright 2012 EEA Copenhagen
Registered first time 16 Nov 2015
Service Description
Environmental noise affects a large number of Europeans. The public perceives it as one of the major environmental problems. It can affect people in both physiological and psychological ways, interfering with basic activities such as sleep, rest, study and communication. Even though these impacts on human health have long been known, recent research shows that they arise at lower noise levels than was previously thought. Environmental noise — an unwanted or harmful outdoor sound — is spreading, both in its duration and geographical coverage. Noise is associated with many human activities, but it is road, rail and air traffic noise that has the highest impact. This is particularly a problem for the urban environment; about 75 % of Europe’s population lives in cities, and traffic volumes are still on the rise. Country reviews show that the number of complaints related to environmental noise is increasing in many European countries. Since environmental noise is persistent and inescapable, a significant proportion of the population is exposed to it. The EU Green Paper Future Noise Policy states that around 20 % of the EU’s population suffer from noise levels that health experts consider to be unacceptable, i.e. which can lead to annoyance, sleep disturbance and adverse health effects. The World Health Organisation (WHO) estimates that about 40 % of the population in the EU is exposed to road traffic noise at levels exceeding 55 dB(A), and that more than 30 % is exposed to levels exceeding 55 dB(A) during the night. In turn, the NOISE database presents the most up-to-date information on noise exposure as officially reported by EEA member countries. The quantification of the related disease burden of environmental noise is an emerging challenge for policy makers. Noise exposure not only leads to sleep disturbance, annoyance and hearing impairment, but also to other health problems such as cardiovascular disorders. The burden of disease from environmental noise has not yet
Description
SRS 3035
Extent 1697064.7726289122,953830.46969513083,5773775.4052648246,5332113.5439999998
Layers Contour Maps,2012 - Update 2015_11,BG - Bulgaria,Bulgaria Major Roads Lden,Bulgaria Major Roads Lnight,CH - Switzerland,Switzerland Major Airports Lden,Switzerland Major Airports Lnight,Switzerland Major Railways Lden,Switzerland Major Railways Lnight,Switzerland Major Roads Lden,Switzerland Major Roads Lnight,Baden Agglomeration Airports Lden,Baden Agglomeration Airports Lnight,Baden Agglomeratio
Map Name Contour Maps
Category
2007_2012_NOISE_END_LAEA_Exposure_Changes (MapServer)
Title 2012_NOISE_END_LAEA_update2015_Exposure_Changes
Author European Topic Centre - Air Pollution and Climate Change Mitigation
Subject Changes in population exposure from 2007 to 2012, as defined by the European Noise Directive
Keywords Noise,Environment,dB,Airports,Railways,Roads
Copyright Text © Copyright 2012 EEA Copenhagen
Registered first time 16 Nov 2015
Service Description
Environmental noise affects a large number of Europeans. The public perceives it as one of the major environmental problems. It can affect people in both physiological and psychological ways, interfering with basic activities such as sleep, rest, study and communication. Even though these impacts on human health have long been known, recent research shows that they arise at lower noise levels than was previously thought. Environmental noise — an unwanted or harmful outdoor sound — is spreading, both in its duration and geographical coverage. Noise is associated with many human activities, but it is road, rail and air traffic noise that has the highest impact. This is particularly a problem for the urban environment; about 75 % of Europe’s population lives in cities, and traffic volumes are still on the rise. Country reviews show that the number of complaints related to environmental noise is increasing in many European countries. Since environmental noise is persistent and inescapable, a significant proportion of the population is exposed to it. The EU Green Paper Future Noise Policy states that around 20 % of the EU’s population suffer from noise levels that health experts consider to be unacceptable, i.e. which can lead to annoyance, sleep disturbance and adverse health effects. The World Health Organisation (WHO) estimates that about 40 % of the population in the EU is exposed to road traffic noise at levels exceeding 55 dB(A), and that more than 30 % is exposed to levels exceeding 55 dB(A) during the night. In turn, the NOISE database presents the most up-to-date information on noise exposure as officially reported by EEA member countries. The quantification of the related disease burden of environmental noise is an emerging challenge for policy makers. Noise exposure not only leads to sleep disturbance, annoyance and hearing impairment, but also to other health problems such as cardiovascular disorders. The burden of disease from environmental noise has not yet
Description
Environmental noise affects a large number of Europeans. The public perceives it as one of the major environmental problems. It can affect people in both physiological and psychological ways, interfering with basic activities such as sleep, rest, study and communication. Even though these impacts on human health have long been known, recent research shows that they arise at lower noise levels than was previously thought. Environmental noise — an unwanted or harmful outdoor sound — is spreading, both in its duration and geographical coverage. Noise is associated with many human activities, but it is road, rail and air traffic noise that has the highest impact. This is particularly a problem for the urban environment; about 75 % of Europe’s population lives in cities, and traffic volumes are still on the rise. Country reviews show that the number of complaints related to environmental noise is increasing in many European countries. Since environmental noise is persistent and inescapable, a significant proportion of the population is exposed to it. The EU Green Paper Future Noise Policy states that around 20 % of the EU’s population suffer from noise levels that health experts consider to be unacceptable, i.e. which can lead to annoyance, sleep disturbance and adverse health effects. The World Health Organisation (WHO) estimates that about 40 % of the population in the EU is exposed to road traffic noise at levels exceeding 55 dB(A), and that more than 30 % is exposed to levels exceeding 55 dB(A) during the night. In turn, the NOISE database presents the most up-to-date information on noise exposure as officially reported by EEA member countries. The quantification of the related disease burden of environmental noise is an emerging challenge for policy makers. Noise exposure not only leads to sleep disturbance, annoyance and hearing impairment, but also to other health problems such as cardiovascular disorders. The burden of disease from environmental noise has not yet
SRS 3035
Extent 1706505.1140000001,962611.36610000022,5799523.1598000005,4484103.5986000001
Layers Changes in population exposure in major airports 2007-2012,Lden >= 55dB,Total - Lden >= 55dB,Data on changes not available,Lnight >= 50dB,Total - Lnight >= 50dB,Data on changes not available,Changes in population exposure within agglomerations 2007-2012,Airports,Lden >= 55dB,Percentage (%) - Lden >= 55dB,Total - Lden >= 55dB,Data on changes not available,Data on changes not applicable,Lnight >
Map Name EEA-NOISE VIEWER
Category
2012_NOISE_END_LAEA_Major_Airports (MapServer)
Title 2012_NOISE_END_LAEA_update2015_Major_Airports
Author European Topic Centre - Air Pollution and Climate Change Mitigation
Subject Noise exposure 2012 delivery from Major Airports data
Keywords Noise,Environment,dB,Airports,Railways,Roads
Copyright Text © Copyright 2012 EEA Copenhagen
Registered first time 16 Nov 2015
Service Description
Environmental noise affects a large number of Europeans. The public perceives it as one of the major environmental problems. It can affect people in both physiological and psychological ways, interfering with basic activities such as sleep, rest, study and communication. Even though these impacts on human health have long been known, recent research shows that they arise at lower noise levels than was previously thought. Environmental noise — an unwanted or harmful outdoor sound — is spreading, both in its duration and geographical coverage. Noise is associated with many human activities, but it is road, rail and air traffic noise that has the highest impact. This is particularly a problem for the urban environment; about 75 % of Europe’s population lives in cities, and traffic volumes are still on the rise. Country reviews show that the number of complaints related to environmental noise is increasing in many European countries. Since environmental noise is persistent and inescapable, a significant proportion of the population is exposed to it. The EU Green Paper Future Noise Policy states that around 20 % of the EU’s population suffer from noise levels that health experts consider to be unacceptable, i.e. which can lead to annoyance, sleep disturbance and adverse health effects. The World Health Organisation (WHO) estimates that about 40 % of the population in the EU is exposed to road traffic noise at levels exceeding 55 dB(A), and that more than 30 % is exposed to levels exceeding 55 dB(A) during the night. In turn, the NOISE database presents the most up-to-date information on noise exposure as officially reported by EEA member countries. The quantification of the related disease burden of environmental noise is an emerging challenge for policy makers. Noise exposure not only leads to sleep disturbance, annoyance and hearing impairment, but also to other health problems such as cardiovascular disorders. The burden of disease from environmental noise has not yet
Description
Environmental noise affects a large number of Europeans. The public perceives it as one of the major environmental problems. It can affect people in both physiological and psychological ways, interfering with basic activities such as sleep, rest, study and communication. Even though these impacts on human health have long been known, recent research shows that they arise at lower noise levels than was previously thought. Environmental noise — an unwanted or harmful outdoor sound — is spreading, both in its duration and geographical coverage. Noise is associated with many human activities, but it is road, rail and air traffic noise that has the highest impact. This is particularly a problem for the urban environment; about 75 % of Europe’s population lives in cities, and traffic volumes are still on the rise. Country reviews show that the number of complaints related to environmental noise is increasing in many European countries. Since environmental noise is persistent and inescapable, a significant proportion of the population is exposed to it. The EU Green Paper Future Noise Policy states that around 20 % of the EU’s population suffer from noise levels that health experts consider to be unacceptable, i.e. which can lead to annoyance, sleep disturbance and adverse health effects. The World Health Organisation (WHO) estimates that about 40 % of the population in the EU is exposed to road traffic noise at levels exceeding 55 dB(A), and that more than 30 % is exposed to levels exceeding 55 dB(A) during the night. In turn, the NOISE database presents the most up-to-date information on noise exposure as officially reported by EEA member countries. The quantification of the related disease burden of environmental noise is an emerging challenge for policy makers. Noise exposure not only leads to sleep disturbance, annoyance and hearing impairment, but also to other health problems such as cardiovascular disorders. The burden of disease from environmental noise has not yet
SRS 3035
Extent -2669700.5290999999,-1909635.5860000001,12870233.2322,12599680.041099999
Layers Major Airports,Lden,Above 55dB,No Data Classes,Total number of people exposed,Less than 4300 people exposed,4300 - 10400 people exposed,10500 - 18300 people exposed,18400 - 52500 people exposed,More than 52500 people exposed,Above 65dB,No Data Classes,Total number of people exposed,Less than 100 people exposed,100 - 400 people exposed,500 - 1100 people exposed,1200 - 1900 people exposed,More than
Map Name EEA-NOISE VIEWER
Category
2012_NOISE_END_LAEA_update2015_Major_Railways (MapServer)
Title 2012_NOISE_END_LAEA_update2015_Major_Railways
Author European Topic Centre - Air Pollution and Climate Change Mitigation
Subject Noise exposure 2012 delivery from Major Railways data
Keywords Noise,Environment,dB,Airports,Railways,Roads
Copyright Text © Copyright 2012 EEA Copenhagen
Registered first time 16 Nov 2015
Service Description
Environmental noise affects a large number of Europeans. The public perceives it as one of the major environmental problems. It can affect people in both physiological and psychological ways, interfering with basic activities such as sleep, rest, study and communication. Even though these impacts on human health have long been known, recent research shows that they arise at lower noise levels than was previously thought. Environmental noise — an unwanted or harmful outdoor sound — is spreading, both in its duration and geographical coverage. Noise is associated with many human activities, but it is road, rail and air traffic noise that has the highest impact. This is particularly a problem for the urban environment; about 75 % of Europe’s population lives in cities, and traffic volumes are still on the rise. Country reviews show that the number of complaints related to environmental noise is increasing in many European countries. Since environmental noise is persistent and inescapable, a significant proportion of the population is exposed to it. The EU Green Paper Future Noise Policy states that around 20 % of the EU’s population suffer from noise levels that health experts consider to be unacceptable, i.e. which can lead to annoyance, sleep disturbance and adverse health effects. The World Health Organisation (WHO) estimates that about 40 % of the population in the EU is exposed to road traffic noise at levels exceeding 55 dB(A), and that more than 30 % is exposed to levels exceeding 55 dB(A) during the night. In turn, the NOISE database presents the most up-to-date information on noise exposure as officially reported by EEA member countries. The quantification of the related disease burden of environmental noise is an emerging challenge for policy makers. Noise exposure not only leads to sleep disturbance, annoyance and hearing impairment, but also to other health problems such as cardiovascular disorders. The burden of disease from environmental noise has not yet
Description
Environmental noise affects a large number of Europeans. The public perceives it as one of the major environmental problems. It can affect people in both physiological and psychological ways, interfering with basic activities such as sleep, rest, study and communication. Even though these impacts on human health have long been known, recent research shows that they arise at lower noise levels than was previously thought. Environmental noise — an unwanted or harmful outdoor sound — is spreading, both in its duration and geographical coverage. Noise is associated with many human activities, but it is road, rail and air traffic noise that has the highest impact. This is particularly a problem for the urban environment; about 75 % of Europe’s population lives in cities, and traffic volumes are still on the rise. Country reviews show that the number of complaints related to environmental noise is increasing in many European countries. Since environmental noise is persistent and inescapable, a significant proportion of the population is exposed to it. The EU Green Paper Future Noise Policy states that around 20 % of the EU’s population suffer from noise levels that health experts consider to be unacceptable, i.e. which can lead to annoyance, sleep disturbance and adverse health effects. The World Health Organisation (WHO) estimates that about 40 % of the population in the EU is exposed to road traffic noise at levels exceeding 55 dB(A), and that more than 30 % is exposed to levels exceeding 55 dB(A) during the night. In turn, the NOISE database presents the most up-to-date information on noise exposure as officially reported by EEA member countries. The quantification of the related disease burden of environmental noise is an emerging challenge for policy makers. Noise exposure not only leads to sleep disturbance, annoyance and hearing impairment, but also to other health problems such as cardiovascular disorders. The burden of disease from environmental noise has not yet
SRS 3035
Extent 942100.94409999996,941726.46030000038,7316568.8191999998,5414446.1773000006
Layers Major Railways,Lden,Above 55dB,No total data available,No relative data available,Total number of people exposed,Relative value of people per km,Above 65dB,No total data available,No relative data available,Total number of people exposed,Relative value of people per km,Above 75dB,No total data available,No relative data available,Total number of people exposed,Relative value of people per km,Lnigh
Map Name EEA-NOISE VIEWER
Category
NOISE_END_LAEA.mxd (MapServer)
Title 2012_NOISE_END_LAEA_update2015_Major_Roads
Author European Topic Centre - Air Pollution and Climate Change Mitigation
Subject Number of people exposed from Major Roads in 2012, as defined by the European Noise Directive.
Keywords Noise,Environment,dB,Airports,Railways,Roads
Copyright Text © Copyright 2012 EEA Copenhagen
Registered first time 16 Nov 2015
Service Description
Environmental noise affects a large number of Europeans. The public perceives it as one of the major environmental problems. It can affect people in both physiological and psychological ways, interfering with basic activities such as sleep, rest, study and communication. Even though these impacts on human health have long been known, recent research shows that they arise at lower noise levels than was previously thought. Environmental noise — an unwanted or harmful outdoor sound — is spreading, both in its duration and geographical coverage. Noise is associated with many human activities, but it is road, rail and air traffic noise that has the highest impact. This is particularly a problem for the urban environment; about 75 % of Europe’s population lives in cities, and traffic volumes are still on the rise. Country reviews show that the number of complaints related to environmental noise is increasing in many European countries. Since environmental noise is persistent and inescapable, a significant proportion of the population is exposed to it. The EU Green Paper Future Noise Policy states that around 20 % of the EU’s population suffer from noise levels that health experts consider to be unacceptable, i.e. which can lead to annoyance, sleep disturbance and adverse health effects. The World Health Organisation (WHO) estimates that about 40 % of the population in the EU is exposed to road traffic noise at levels exceeding 55 dB(A), and that more than 30 % is exposed to levels exceeding 55 dB(A) during the night. In turn, the NOISE database presents the most up-to-date information on noise exposure as officially reported by EEA member countries. The quantification of the related disease burden of environmental noise is an emerging challenge for policy makers. Noise exposure not only leads to sleep disturbance, annoyance and hearing impairment, but also to other health problems such as cardiovascular disorders. The burden of disease from environmental noise has not yet
Description
Environmental noise affects a large number of Europeans. The public perceives it as one of the major environmental problems. It can affect people in both physiological and psychological ways, interfering with basic activities such as sleep, rest, study and communication. Even though these impacts on human health have long been known, recent research shows that they arise at lower noise levels than was previously thought. Environmental noise — an unwanted or harmful outdoor sound — is spreading, both in its duration and geographical coverage. Noise is associated with many human activities, but it is road, rail and air traffic noise that has the highest impact. This is particularly a problem for the urban environment; about 75 % of Europe’s population lives in cities, and traffic volumes are still on the rise. Country reviews show that the number of complaints related to environmental noise is increasing in many European countries. Since environmental noise is persistent and inescapable, a significant proportion of the population is exposed to it. The EU Green Paper Future Noise Policy states that around 20 % of the EU’s population suffer from noise levels that health experts consider to be unacceptable, i.e. which can lead to annoyance, sleep disturbance and adverse health effects. The World Health Organisation (WHO) estimates that about 40 % of the population in the EU is exposed to road traffic noise at levels exceeding 55 dB(A), and that more than 30 % is exposed to levels exceeding 55 dB(A) during the night. In turn, the NOISE database presents the most up-to-date information on noise exposure as officially reported by EEA member countries. The quantification of the related disease burden of environmental noise is an emerging challenge for policy makers. Noise exposure not only leads to sleep disturbance, annoyance and hearing impairment, but also to other health problems such as cardiovascular disorders. The burden of disease from environmental noise has not yet
SRS 3035
Extent 942100.94409999996,941726.46030000038,7316568.8191999998,5414446.1773000006
Layers Major Roads,Lden,Above 55dB,No total data available,No relative data available,Total number of people exposed,Relative value of people per km,Above 65dB,No total data available,No relative data available,Total number of people exposed,Relative value of people per km,Above 75dB,No total data available,No relative data available,Total number of people exposed,Relative value of people per km,Lnight,A
Map Name EEA-NOISE VIEWER
Category
Noise Sources 2012 (MapServer)
Title 2012_NOISE_END_LAEA_update2015_Noise_Sources
Author European Topic Centre - Air Pollution and Climate Change Mitigation
Subject Noise Sources and auxiliary layers of the Noise Viewer 2012
Keywords Noise,sources,airports,agglomerations,major roads,major railways
Copyright Text © Copyright 2012 EEA Copenhagen
Registered first time 16 Nov 2015
Service Description
This service is supporting the Noise Viewer 2012 with data related with Noise sources such as agglomerations inhabitants, airport traffic, major roads, major railways, country borders and naming for airports and agglomerations
Description
This service is supporting the Noise Viewer 2012 with data related with Noise sources such as agglomerations inhabitants, airport traffic, major roads, major railways, country borders and naming for airports and agglomerations
SRS 3035
Extent -2672726.7126000002,-3062258.7697000001,12627198.3358,12599680.041099999
Layers Noise Sources,Airport Names,Agglomerations Names,Airport Anual Traffic (movements per year),Agglomerations (Number of inhabitants),Major Roads 2005,Major Roads,Major Rails 2005,Major Rails,Country border grey,Agglomerations Names General View
Map Name EEA-NOISE VIEWER
Category
2012_NOISE_END_LAEA_Within_Agglomerations (MapServer)
Title 2012_NOISE_END_LAEA_update2015_Within_Agglo
Author European Topic Centre - Air Pollution and Climate Change Mitigation
Subject Number of people exposed within agglomerations in 2012, as defined by the European Noise Directive.
Keywords Noise,Environment,dB,Airports,Railways,Roads
Copyright Text © Copyright 2012 EEA Copenhagen
Registered first time 16 Nov 2015
Service Description
Environmental noise affects a large number of Europeans. The public perceives it as one of the major environmental problems. It can affect people in both physiological and psychological ways, interfering with basic activities such as sleep, rest, study and communication. Even though these impacts on human health have long been known, recent research shows that they arise at lower noise levels than was previously thought. Environmental noise — an unwanted or harmful outdoor sound — is spreading, both in its duration and geographical coverage. Noise is associated with many human activities, but it is road, rail and air traffic noise that has the highest impact. This is particularly a problem for the urban environment; about 75 % of Europe’s population lives in cities, and traffic volumes are still on the rise. Country reviews show that the number of complaints related to environmental noise is increasing in many European countries. Since environmental noise is persistent and inescapable, a significant proportion of the population is exposed to it. The EU Green Paper Future Noise Policy states that around 20 % of the EU’s population suffer from noise levels that health experts consider to be unacceptable, i.e. which can lead to annoyance, sleep disturbance and adverse health effects. The World Health Organisation (WHO) estimates that about 40 % of the population in the EU is exposed to road traffic noise at levels exceeding 55 dB(A), and that more than 30 % is exposed to levels exceeding 55 dB(A) during the night. In turn, the NOISE database presents the most up-to-date information on noise exposure as officially reported by EEA member countries. The quantification of the related disease burden of environmental noise is an emerging challenge for policy makers. Noise exposure not only leads to sleep disturbance, annoyance and hearing impairment, but also to other health problems such as cardiovascular disorders. The burden of disease from environmental noise has not yet
Description
Environmental noise affects a large number of Europeans. The public perceives it as one of the major environmental problems. It can affect people in both physiological and psychological ways, interfering with basic activities such as sleep, rest, study and communication. Even though these impacts on human health have long been known, recent research shows that they arise at lower noise levels than was previously thought. Environmental noise — an unwanted or harmful outdoor sound — is spreading, both in its duration and geographical coverage. Noise is associated with many human activities, but it is road, rail and air traffic noise that has the highest impact. This is particularly a problem for the urban environment; about 75 % of Europe’s population lives in cities, and traffic volumes are still on the rise. Country reviews show that the number of complaints related to environmental noise is increasing in many European countries. Since environmental noise is persistent and inescapable, a significant proportion of the population is exposed to it. The EU Green Paper Future Noise Policy states that around 20 % of the EU’s population suffer from noise levels that health experts consider to be unacceptable, i.e. which can lead to annoyance, sleep disturbance and adverse health effects. The World Health Organisation (WHO) estimates that about 40 % of the population in the EU is exposed to road traffic noise at levels exceeding 55 dB(A), and that more than 30 % is exposed to levels exceeding 55 dB(A) during the night. In turn, the NOISE database presents the most up-to-date information on noise exposure as officially reported by EEA member countries. The quantification of the related disease burden of environmental noise is an emerging challenge for policy makers. Noise exposure not only leads to sleep disturbance, annoyance and hearing impairment, but also to other health problems such as cardiovascular disorders. The burden of disease from environmental noise has not yet
SRS 3035
Extent -2678358.3004000001,-3075651.3123000003,12870233.2322,12599680.041099999
Layers Within Agglomerations,Airports,Lden,Above 55dB,No total data available,No percentage data available,Total number of people exposed,Percentage,Above 65dB,No total data available,No percentage data available,Total number of people exposed,Percentage,Above 75dB,No total data available,No percentage data available,Total number of people exposed,Percentage,Lnight,Above 50dB,No total data available,No p
Map Name EEA-NOISE VIEWER
Category
2012_NOISE_END_LAEA_Within_Agglomerations (MapServer)
Title 2012_NOISE_END_LAEA_Within_Agglomerations
Author European Topic Centre - Air Pollution and Climate Change Mitigation
Subject Number of people exposed within agglomerations in 2012, as defined by the European Noise Directive.
Keywords Noise,Environment,dB,Airports,Railways,Roads
Copyright Text © Copyright 2012 EEA Copenhagen
Registered first time 06 Oct 2014
Service Description
Environmental noise affects a large number of Europeans. The public perceives it as one of the major environmental problems. It can affect people in both physiological and psychological ways, interfering with basic activities such as sleep, rest, study and communication. Even though these impacts on human health have long been known, recent research shows that they arise at lower noise levels than was previously thought. Environmental noise — an unwanted or harmful outdoor sound — is spreading, both in its duration and geographical coverage. Noise is associated with many human activities, but it is road, rail and air traffic noise that has the highest impact. This is particularly a problem for the urban environment; about 75 % of Europe’s population lives in cities, and traffic volumes are still on the rise. Country reviews show that the number of complaints related to environmental noise is increasing in many European countries. Since environmental noise is persistent and inescapable, a significant proportion of the population is exposed to it. The EU Green Paper Future Noise Policy states that around 20 % of the EU’s population suffer from noise levels that health experts consider to be unacceptable, i.e. which can lead to annoyance, sleep disturbance and adverse health effects. The World Health Organisation (WHO) estimates that about 40 % of the population in the EU is exposed to road traffic noise at levels exceeding 55 dB(A), and that more than 30 % is exposed to levels exceeding 55 dB(A) during the night. In turn, the NOISE database presents the most up-to-date information on noise exposure as officially reported by EEA member countries. The quantification of the related disease burden of environmental noise is an emerging challenge for policy makers. Noise exposure not only leads to sleep disturbance, annoyance and hearing impairment, but also to other health problems such as cardiovascular disorders. The burden of disease from environmental noise has not yet
Description
Environmental noise affects a large number of Europeans. The public perceives it as one of the major environmental problems. It can affect people in both physiological and psychological ways, interfering with basic activities such as sleep, rest, study and communication. Even though these impacts on human health have long been known, recent research shows that they arise at lower noise levels than was previously thought. Environmental noise — an unwanted or harmful outdoor sound — is spreading, both in its duration and geographical coverage. Noise is associated with many human activities, but it is road, rail and air traffic noise that has the highest impact. This is particularly a problem for the urban environment; about 75 % of Europe’s population lives in cities, and traffic volumes are still on the rise. Country reviews show that the number of complaints related to environmental noise is increasing in many European countries. Since environmental noise is persistent and inescapable, a significant proportion of the population is exposed to it. The EU Green Paper Future Noise Policy states that around 20 % of the EU’s population suffer from noise levels that health experts consider to be unacceptable, i.e. which can lead to annoyance, sleep disturbance and adverse health effects. The World Health Organisation (WHO) estimates that about 40 % of the population in the EU is exposed to road traffic noise at levels exceeding 55 dB(A), and that more than 30 % is exposed to levels exceeding 55 dB(A) during the night. In turn, the NOISE database presents the most up-to-date information on noise exposure as officially reported by EEA member countries. The quantification of the related disease burden of environmental noise is an emerging challenge for policy makers. Noise exposure not only leads to sleep disturbance, annoyance and hearing impairment, but also to other health problems such as cardiovascular disorders. The burden of disease from environmental noise has not yet
SRS 3035
Extent -2678358.3004000001,-3075651.3123000003,12870233.2322,12599680.041099999
Layers Within Agglomerations,Airports,Lden,Above 55dB,No data classes,Total number of people exposed,Percentage ,Above 65dB,No data classes,Total number of people exposed,Percentage,Above 75dB,No data classes,Total number of people exposed,Percentage,Lnight,Above 50dB,No data classes,Total number of people exposed,Percentage ,Above 60dB,No data classes,Total number of people exposed,Percentage,Above 70dB
Map Name EEA-NOISE VIEWER
Category
EEA-NOISE VIEWER (MapServer)
Title Noise_Dyna_LAEA
Author f_domingues
Subject Environmental Noise Map
Keywords Noise,Environment,dB,Airports,Railways,Roads
Copyright Text © Copyright 2011 EEA Copenhagen
Registered first time 06 Oct 2014
Service Description
Environmental noise affects a large number of Europeans. The public perceives it as one of the major environmental problems. It can affect people in both physiological and psychological ways, interfering with basic activities such as sleep, rest, study and communication. Even though these impacts on human health have long been known, recent research shows that they arise at lower noise levels than was previously thought. Environmental noise — an unwanted or harmful outdoor sound — is spreading, both in its duration and geographical coverage. Noise is associated with many human activities, but it is road, rail and air traffic noise that has the highest impact. This is particularly a problem for the urban environment; about 75 % of Europe’s population lives in cities, and traffic volumes are still on the rise. Country reviews show that the number of complaints related to environmental noise is increasing in many European countries. Since environmental noise is persistent and inescapable, a significant proportion of the population is exposed to it. The EU Green Paper Future Noise Policy states that around 20 % of the EU’s population suffer from noise levels that health experts consider to be unacceptable, i.e. which can lead to annoyance, sleep disturbance and adverse health effects. The World Health Organisation (WHO) estimates that about 40 % of the population in the EU is exposed to road traffic noise at levels exceeding 55 dB(A), and that more than 30 % is exposed to levels exceeding 55 dB(A) during the night. In turn, the NOISE database presents the most up-to-date information on noise exposure as officially reported by EEA member countries. The quantification of the related disease burden of environmental noise is an emerging challenge for policy makers. Noise exposure not only leads to sleep disturbance, annoyance and hearing impairment, but also to other health problems such as cardiovascular disorders. The burden of disease from environmental noise has
Description
Environmental noise affects a large number of Europeans. The public perceives it as one of the major environmental problems. It can affect people in both physiological and psychological ways, interfering with basic activities such as sleep, rest, study and communication. Even though these impacts on human health have long been known, recent research shows that they arise at lower noise levels than was previously thought. Environmental noise — an unwanted or harmful outdoor sound — is spreading, both in its duration and geographical coverage. Noise is associated with many human activities, but it is road, rail and air traffic noise that has the highest impact. This is particularly a problem for the urban environment; about 75 % of Europe’s population lives in cities, and traffic volumes are still on the rise. Country reviews show that the number of complaints related to environmental noise is increasing in many European countries. Since environmental noise is persistent and inescapable, a significant proportion of the population is exposed to it. The EU Green Paper Future Noise Policy states that around 20 % of the EU’s population suffer from noise levels that health experts consider to be unacceptable, i.e. which can lead to annoyance, sleep disturbance and adverse health effects. The World Health Organisation (WHO) estimates that about 40 % of the population in the EU is exposed to road traffic noise at levels exceeding 55 dB(A), and that more than 30 % is exposed to levels exceeding 55 dB(A) during the night. In turn, the NOISE database presents the most up-to-date information on noise exposure as officially reported by EEA member countries. The quantification of the related disease burden of environmental noise is an emerging challenge for policy makers. Noise exposure not only leads to sleep disturbance, annoyance and hearing impairment, but also to other health problems such as cardiovascular disorders. The burden of disease from environmental noise has
SRS
Extent -3100966.0258,-2409699.7697,13209655.1716,14652703.519
Layers Airport Names,Agglomeration Names,Railways and Roads,Roads,Railways,Countries Border White,Within Agglomerations,Airports,Lden,Above 55dB,No data classes,Total number of people exposed,Percentage ,Above 65dB,No data classes,Total number of people exposed,Percentage,Above 75dB,No data classes,Total number of people exposed,Percentage,Lnight,Above 50dB,No data classes,Total number of people exposed,
Map Name EEA-NOISE VIEWER
Category
2012_NOISE_END_LAEA_Contours (MapServer)
Title NOISE_END_LAEA10_update2015_Contours_faster
Author European Topic Centre - Air Pollution and Climate Change Mitigation
Subject Noise levels in 2012, expressed in contour maps and measured in dB, as defined by the European Noise Directive
Keywords Noise,Environment,dB,Airports,Railways,Roads
Copyright Text © Copyright 2012 EEA Copenhagen
Registered first time 24 Nov 2016
Service Description
Environmental noise affects a large number of Europeans. The public perceives it as one of the major environmental problems. It can affect people in both physiological and psychological ways, interfering with basic activities such as sleep, rest, study and communication. Even though these impacts on human health have long been known, recent research shows that they arise at lower noise levels than was previously thought. Environmental noise — an unwanted or harmful outdoor sound — is spreading, both in its duration and geographical coverage. Noise is associated with many human activities, but it is road, rail and air traffic noise that has the highest impact. This is particularly a problem for the urban environment; about 75 % of Europe’s population lives in cities, and traffic volumes are still on the rise. Country reviews show that the number of complaints related to environmental noise is increasing in many European countries. Since environmental noise is persistent and inescapable, a significant proportion of the population is exposed to it. The EU Green Paper Future Noise Policy states that around 20 % of the EU’s population suffer from noise levels that health experts consider to be unacceptable, i.e. which can lead to annoyance, sleep disturbance and adverse health effects. The World Health Organisation (WHO) estimates that about 40 % of the population in the EU is exposed to road traffic noise at levels exceeding 55 dB(A), and that more than 30 % is exposed to levels exceeding 55 dB(A) during the night. In turn, the NOISE database presents the most up-to-date information on noise exposure as officially reported by EEA member countries. The quantification of the related disease burden of environmental noise is an emerging challenge for policy makers. Noise exposure not only leads to sleep disturbance, annoyance and hearing impairment, but also to other health problems such as cardiovascular disorders. The burden of disease from environmental noise has not yet
Description
SRS 3035
Extent 2778415.6442990117,1427673.9760928792,5773775.4052648246,5332113.5439999998
Layers Contour Maps,2012 - Update 2015_11,BG - Bulgaria,Bulgaria Major Roads Lden,Bulgaria Major Roads Lnight,CH - Switzerland,Switzerland Major Airports Lden,Switzerland Major Airports Lnight,Switzerland Major Railways Lden,Switzerland Major Railways Lnight,Switzerland Major Roads Lden,Switzerland Major Roads Lnight,Baden Agglomeration Airports Lden,Baden Agglomeration Airports Lnight,Baden Agglomeratio
Map Name Contour Maps
Category
Urban Noise Grid (MapServer)
Title NoiseGrid_Dyna_LAEA
Author Magnusson
Subject Mean noise agglomeration at 55dB Lden per source (Air, Industry, Road, & Rail) across city coverage.
Keywords Noise,Environment,dB,Airports,Railways,Roads
Copyright Text © EEA Copenhagen 2011
Registered first time 06 Oct 2014
Service Description
Environmental noise —unwanted or harmful outdoor sound — is spreading, both in its duration and geographical coverage. Noise is associated with many human activities, but it is road, rail and air traffic noise that has the highest impact. This is particularly a problem for the urban environment; about 75 % of Europe’s population lives in cities, and traffic volumes are still on the rise. Country reviews show that the number of complaints related to environmental noise is increasing in many European countries. This map depicts the mean noise agglomeration at 55dB Lden per source (Air, Industry, Road, & Rail) across city coverage. Data source: http://noise.eionet.europa.eu/
Description
Environmental noise —unwanted or harmful outdoor sound — is spreading, both in its duration and geographical coverage. Noise is associated with many human activities, but it is road, rail and air traffic noise that has the highest impact. This is particularly a problem for the urban environment; about 75 % of Europe’s population lives in cities, and traffic volumes are still on the rise. Country reviews show that the number of complaints related to environmental noise is increasing in many European countries. This map depicts the mean noise agglomeration at 55dB Lden per source (Air, Industry, Road, & Rail) across city coverage.
SRS
Extent 1735957.0503,973558.6764,5799557.0503,4220158.6764
Layers NoiseGridCenters,Noise Agglomeration Air 55dB Lden,Noise Agglomeration Industry 55dB Lden,Noise Agglomeration Road 55dB Lden,Noise Agglomeration Rail 55dB Lden
Map Name EoE Noise Watch
Category
Urban Noise Grid (MapServer)
Title UrbanNoise_Dyna_WM
Author Magnusson
Subject Mean noise agglomeration at 55dB Lden per source (Air, Industry, Road, & Rail) across city coverage.
Keywords Noise,Environment,dB
Copyright Text © EEA Copenhagen 2011
Registered first time 06 Oct 2014
Service Description
Environmental noise —unwanted or harmful outdoor sound — is spreading, both in its duration and geographical coverage. Noise is associated with many human activities, but it is road, rail and air traffic noise that has the highest impact. This is particularly a problem for the urban environment; about 75 % of Europe’s population lives in cities, and traffic volumes are still on the rise. Country reviews show that the number of complaints related to environmental noise is increasing in many European countries. This map depicts the mean noise agglomeration at 55dB Lden per source (Air, Industry, Road, & Rail) across city coverage. Data source: http://noise.eionet.europa.eu/
Description
Environmental noise —unwanted or harmful outdoor sound — is spreading, both in its duration and geographical coverage. Noise is associated with many human activities, but it is road, rail and air traffic noise that has the highest impact. This is particularly a problem for the urban environment; about 75 % of Europe’s population lives in cities, and traffic volumes are still on the rise. Country reviews show that the number of complaints related to environmental noise is increasing in many European countries. This map depicts the mean noise agglomeration at 55dB Lden per source (Air, Industry, Road, & Rail) across city coverage.
SRS 102100
Extent -3580993.8361972272,3222412.3815302905,4015306.1638027728,8644712.3815302905
Layers Urban Noise Centers,Urban Cover
Map Name EoE Noise Watch
Category